Life Insurance Settlements – Unlock the Cash From Your Life Insurance Policy Today

A life settlement, or the sale of a life insurance policy, is gaining popularity as a new opportunity for seniors to generate cash. By “cashing in” a life insurance policy, one can reap the rewards of an immediate cash payout without lapsing or surrendering the policy to the insurance company.

Faced with rising insurance premiums, increasing cost of healthcare and long-term care, more seniors today are choosing to sell their policies to third parties for a lump sum payment. Rather than let their policy lapse, seniors have the option of cashing out early and enjoying a higher quality of life.

Seniors can use the cash they receive from the sale to help pay for medical expenses, long-term care expenses, or everyday living expenses. Additionally, seniors are using the “unlocked” cash to travel, invest in a business or new property, or support their children and grandchildren. There are no restrictions or limits to how the cash may be used once the policy is sold.

How does it work?
Seniors who are over 70 and own a policy worth over $200,000 can sell their policy to an insurance buyer, otherwise known as life insurance broker or life settlement brokers.

By purchasing the whole, term, or universal life insurance policy, the buyer becomes the new policy owner. This means that the buyer takes over the premium payments and ultimately collects the full amount of the death benefit.

Who benefits?
As the policy holder, seniors may enjoy a higher cash payout upfront and the savings when the buyer takes over the ongoing insurance premium payments.

What’s the catch?
There is no catch. Settlements are legal and legitimate. Life insurance buyers are able to offer a cash payout because of the structure of their businesses and the financial market.

What should I know before considering a settlement?
The ideal time to sell a policy, otherwise known as taking a life settlement, is when:

1. The policy holder is over age 70
2. The policy is worth $200,000 or more
3. The policy holder is chronically ill, and/or their health is declining
4. Additional cash is needed to pay for cost of health care of long-term care
5. Policy holder is experiencing financial difficulties or needs additional funds to improve the quality of life
6. There is difficulty paying the premiums and are at risk of lapsing the insurance policy
7. The senior would like to remain financially independent

How much money can I expect to receive?
The lump sum payment will be determined on a case-by-case basis. It depends on a number of factors, including age and medical condition, the type and value of the policy and the premiums required to keep the policy active. A no-obligation appraisal of your policy can be requested before making the decision to sell it.

Any policy owner, including individuals, corporations, charities or trusts, may sell any insurance policy, including group and term policies.

What types of life insurance policies can be sold?
Universal Life, Whole Life, Variable Universal Life, Term, and Convertible Term Life policies, Joint and second-to-die policies are all policies eligible for sale.

How long does it take to get the funds once my policy is sold?
A general time frame is four to eight weeks to receive funds though the timing can vary. The buyers work to complete the process as quickly and efficiently as possible so that the money can be released to our clients as fast as possible.

Will I owe taxes on the money I receive?
Generally, the money received from selling the insurance policy will be tax-free up to the original policy’s tax-basis. Consult with a tax advisor regarding your specific situation.

How do I find a buyer for my policy?
Experts at http://www.LifeInsuranceBuyer are committed to achieving the highest value for their client’s insurance policies. Serving their clients with integrity and respect, Life Insurance Buyer offers free, no obligation, confidential policy appraisals for all qualified individuals. Contact Life Insurance Buyer at 1-800-LI-BUYER or 1-800-542-8937 to discuss your policy.

How to Keep Your Life Insurance Policy From Lapsing, an Expert’s Advice

An all-too-common occurrence for life insurance policy holders is one in which someone purchased a life insurance policy several years ago, they have been paying premiums faithfully, and they unexpectedly receive a Lapse Notice. The Notice states, “… your premium is not enough to cover the policy expenses, please submit (a lot more) money to keep your valuable coverage.”

You’ll probably look to the insurer or agent for help. Here are some things you should consider to maintain your valuable coverage.

Often the policy owner thinks of life insurance the same way they think of auto insurance. They receive a premium notice, they pay the premium amount stated on the notice, and they believe they have met their requirement to secure the coverage. What they don’t realize is that with life insurance plans, such as universal life, indexed life, whole life and variable life, the premium is not the same as the cost.

Premium is what you pay to the insurance company. The policy fees are the cost of the coverage.

With these policies as the insured gets older the life insurance policy costs more. This is where the trouble usually happens. At some point in time, and often unbeknownst to the policy owner, the policy expenses exceed the premium being paid. This triggers a feature in the policy which allows the insurer to take money from the policy’s cash value, without having to notify the policy owner, to make-up any shortage of policy expenses. As this event occurs every month, the life insurance policy will be depleted of its cash value and move towards a lapse.

Before a life insurance policy lapse, the insurer is obligated to mail a lapse notice which allows the policy owner 31 days to pay enough premium to cover one month’s worth of expenses. The problem however, is that the expenses will typically have greatly exceeded the amount of premium the owner had been paying.

It’s common for the new premium to be three or four, or even more, times as much as they had been paying. This can put the cost of coverage out of their financial reach. The increase in premiums may not be justified, and a life insurance expert should evaluate the policy to determine if you’re being over-charged.

One thing you can do to make sure you aren’t caught off guard by increasing policy fees, and lose your valuable coverage, is to review your policy with an agent every year. In this meeting you should bring a recent Annual Statement for the policy and the agent should bring in-force illustrations. These are the tools that will best inform you of the policy’s expenses and where your premium amounts should be set for the year.

If you’ve received a lapse notice for your life insurance policy, here are a few things you can do:

1. Lower the death benefit to an affordable amount. The lower the death benefit the lower the premium will be.

2. Ask the insurer for the cost to keep the policy in-force to an age less than maturity. In other words, a universal life insurance policy, as one example, will stay in-force until the insured’s age 100. Fees are set based on this age assumption — 100. If you tell the insurer you only want the policy to stay in-force to age 86 (for example), the premium required will be less.

3. Ask the insurer if they offer a less expensive insurance product that you can exchange your policy for.

4. Get the assistance of a qualified agent to help you understand and make decisions about your policy.

5. Have a life insurance analyst review the policy, past payments and future payments to determine if you’re being over-charged for the coverage.

Life Insurance Policies

There are various aspects to consider before getting a life insurance policy. One of them is a sustained doubt about the significance and need for life insurance. A life insurance policy is relevant for all individuals who are concerned about the financial future of their family in case of death.

Apart from the purely protectional needs, life insurance policies, like whole and variable life insurance, offer the opportunity for tax-free investment and reaping dividends, and they have a built-in cash value. Purchased with due discretion, it can be utilized as liquid cash to cater to the various needs of policyholders.

There are various types of life insurance policies customized to suit the different needs of various individuals. Depending on the number of dependants and kind of insurance needs, a suitable life insurance policy can be chosen after consultation with financial experts and advisors.

Whole life insurance and term life insurance are the two basic forms of insurance policies. With time, there have been different variations to suit the changing demands of people. A term life insurance policy is also called temporary or short-term life insurance. These are purely protection-oriented and provide death benefits only if the insured dies within the period specified in the policy. In case the insured lives past the specified duration, no money is given.

People with short-term insurance needs, like a young individual with dependents, a house loan or a car loan, favor this kind of insurance policy because they are cheap and affordable in comparison to whole life policies. In the initial years the premiums are very low; however, as the mortality risk of the insured increases with age the premium cost increases and at time becomes more than that of whole life insurance.

There are now two kinds of term life insurance, namely level term (decreasing premium) and annual renewable term (increasing premium) policies. The premiums of level term are initially higher than renewable term, but become lower in the later years. Whole life insurance has an ingrained cash value and guaranteed life protection features. The initial steep premiums of whole life insurance may exceed the actual cost of the insurance. This surplus, which is the cash value, is added to a separate account and can be used as a tax-free investment to reap dividends, and is also used to enable the insured to give a level premium latter on. There is a guarantee of getting the death benefit on the maturity of the policy or death of the insured, apart from cash value surrendered in case of cancellation.

Return of premium is popular because it combines the features of whole and term policies. It costs double the amount of a term policy. The policy is made for a set time, but full value is given on death within that period or in case the policy matures. Universal, variable and universal variables are different variations of whole life insurance policies. A universal life insurance policy offers the flexibility to the insured to choose the kind of premium payment, the death benefits and the coverage amount.

Variable life insurance policies enable the insurance buyer to invest the cash value in direct investment for a greater potential return. A universal variable insurance policy integrates the flexibility factor of a universal policy and the investment option of a variable policy. Single purchase life insurance enables a buyer to buy the policy and own it through a one-time premium payment. A survivorship or second-to-die insurance policy is a joint form of life insurance policy which is devised to serve the specific purpose of certain individuals. Apart from these, there are also endowment life insurance policies. Endowment is with profit kind or unit-liked kind. On maturity of the policy or on the death of the insured the value of the policy or the amount insured, whichever is more, is given back.

Life insurance policies differ from company to company, and hence the various parameters have to be analyzed meticulously with the help of experts and financial advisors to get the best deal.